The Honorable Alan M. Dunn
 
 
 

AMDunn-325The Honorable Alan M. Dunn

Board Member, American Australian Council

Partner
Stewart and Stewart

Mr. Dunn is a partner in the Washington, D.C. based international trade law firm Stewart and Stewart, where his practice focuses on a wide range of international trade, transactional, regulatory, and governance issues. He serves on several corporate and non-profit boards. He also serves on U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry’s Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy (ACIEP) Sanctions Subcommittee.

Mr. Dunn was formerly U.S. Assistant Secretary of Commerce, appointed by President George H. W. Bush, and was among the senior U.S. officials responsible for forming and implementing U.S. trade-related policy. He served as one of the lead U.S. negotiators of the multilateral GATT Uruguay Round negotiations, which established the World Trade Organization (WTO), the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the High Enriched Uranium (HEU) Agreement with Russia.

Mr. Dunn also participated as a lead negotiator or member of the U.S. delegation in a wide range of bilateral and multilateral trade negotiations dealing with a number of issues such as the 1991 U.S.-Japan Semiconductor Arrangement, the Montreal Protocol on Ozone Depleting Substances, and the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

In addition, Mr. Dunn served in an ex officio capacity as a director on the board of U.S. Export Import Bank (USEXIM) and Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC), as well as a member of the Trade Promotion Coordinating Committee (TPCC) and the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS).

Prior to joining Stewart and Stewart, Mr. Dunn was a partner in the firm of White & Case and a member of the U.S. Foreign Service at the Department of State.

Mr. Dunn has a law degree from the University of Virginia and a degree in finance and business administration from George Mason University.

The American Australian Council promotes productive and timely bilateral exchanges among leaders in government, business, national security, technology, academic, media, and cultural arenas.